How It Went Down by Kekla Magoon

Racial injustice persists when people turn a blind-eye or distance themselves from it by isolating it to some “other” community. This book removes that distance and helps readers view the issue through many perspectives. Don’t look away; keep bearing witness and remake the world anew.

The Secret Life of Stories by Michael Bérubé

Bérubé, Michael. The Secret Life of Stories: From Don Quixote to Potter, How Understanding Intellectual Disability Transforms the Way We Read. New York: NYUP, 2016. Print. Summary: Regardless of whether a book features a disabled person, says Bérubé, all literature on the whole is haunted with intellectual disability in some way. At times, disability sparks or corrupts motives,… Continue reading The Secret Life of Stories by Michael Bérubé

How It Went Down by Kekla Magoon

Magoon, Kekla. How It Went Down. New York: Henry Holt, 2014. Print. Genre: YA (Rashomon) Summary: The tragic shooting of a young black man rips apart an inner city neighborhood. The white man responsible for the killing walks free. Sound familiar? Sadly, this tragic scenario expends gallons of newspaper ink and hours of news coverage… Continue reading How It Went Down by Kekla Magoon

Words in the Dust by Trent Reedy

Reedy, Trent. Words in the Dust. New York: Arthur A. Levine, 2011. Print. Genre: middle grade (cultural) Summary: Zulaikha might be a young, illiterate Afghani girl, but she already knows how her entire future will be. She will forever live at home, working like a slave for her father’s second wife — a woman who hates… Continue reading Words in the Dust by Trent Reedy